Child & Youth Counselling

Here is what you need to know if you are considering counselling for your child. 
 
COUNSELLING IS A PROCESS
Therapy is a unique experience for everyone. Some people need a few sessions, and some people need many sessions. Sometimes change and healing can be subtle and slow, be patient with the process. So, what can you expect? As the client learns more about themselves and develops new skills, this can also lead to changes in the family dynamics and potential discomfort until it becomes familiar and adjusted for. 
 
BRINGING A CHILD IN FOR COUNSELLING CAN BE CHALLENGING
You may notice changes in behaviour in your child and want to encourage counselling, however, they may not feel ready. It is important that the child/teen is onboard with therapy. We have found that having a discussion with your child around the benefits to them can often be useful. We also offer FREE 15-minute consults for the child to meet the therapist allowing them to gauge their own comfort level. 
 
MY TEEN IS RELUCTANT TO ATTEND THERAPY, HOW WILL YOU CONNECT WITH MY TEEN? 
Many youths and teens find this time in their life to be filled with conflicting emotions and experiences. We know that they may often not want to come to therapy, and we get that it. We genuinely respect that it can be hard to come to therapy and that it might take some time to develop trust. One of the ways we work to connect with this age group is by spending time getting to know them in whatever way makes sense for them and sometimes that is bonding over silly videos or what is happening with their friends. Our youth therapists are specialists in working with young people and really care to get to know teens in all aspects of their lives. 
 
IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT CONSENT AND CONFIDENTIALITY
This is dictated by legislation. A person 12 or over who has capacity (understands what therapy is including its risks, benefits, and alternatives) can agree or disagree on their own accord to enter therapy. The same terms that apply to capacity also apply to confidentiality. This means that your child decides what information their therapist is allowed to share or not share with you about the content of the 
sessions. Of course, there are limits to confidentiality, especially when related to safety concerns (harm to self or harm to others). This means that in most cases there is very little if any contact between the parent(s)/guardian(s) and therapist. We encourage teens to be in open communication with their parents about counselling. 


Something to reflect about: Your child is most likely looking for a safe space to be able to discuss their struggles. It may take quite some time to develop a rapport with them and have them feel that safety. If your child knew or believed that everything they shared would be then discussed with their parents or guardians, they may not feel safe enough to bring up their worries. 

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